Oxymetholone test cycle

Aromatase inhibitors are the compounds that serve to reduce estradiol levels in blood by eliminating the production of estradiol through binding to and disabling the aromatase enzyme, which is responsible for the conversion (or aromatization) of androgens into estradiol. Suicidal aromatase inhibitors serve to permanently inhibit and disable the aromatase enzyme to which it is bound to. This renders the enzyme inactive forever. The body will eventually manufacture more aromatase enzymes, but the currently-bound enzymes are bound indefinitely, eliminating any risk for estrogen rebound. This is the main difference compared alongside two other major aromatase inhibitors: anastrozole and letrozole, which are non-suicidal aromatase inhibitors that are only bound to the aromatase enzyme for limited time periods. If a non-suicidal aromatase inhibitor is halted too abruptly, the circulating inhibited aromatase enzymes that have not been metabolized out of the body will then become free again, and begin aromatizing androgens into estrogens at an often rapid rate. This is not the case with Exos.

Oxymetholone (also known as anapolon or anadrol) is a very drastic synthetic steroid, 17-alpha-alkylated modification of dihydrotestosterone. It was developed for the treatment of osteoporosis and anaemia, as well as to stimulate muscle gain in malnourished and debilitated patients. Oxymetholone has been approved by the American Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for use in humans. Later there where created non-steroidal drugs that effectively could treat anaemia and osteoporosis; because of this anapolon lost his popularity and by 1993 Syntex decided to cease the production of the drug, as well as other manufacturers did. 

Oxymetholone test cycle

oxymetholone test cycle


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