Septic and aseptic complications of corticosteroid injections

In a sterile environment or procedure, antiseptically washed hands and treated surfaces are used to eliminate as many microorganisms as possible and subsequently prevent their transfer from surfaces, interpersonal contact and the air while a patient undergoes an invasive procedure or procedure where the skin barrier is broken. In an aseptic environment or procedure, the concern is somewhat less critical, focusing more on cleanliness to eliminate the transfer or collection of disease-causing bacterium, viruses or other microorganisms. Hands are still washed and new clean gloves used in aseptic procedures, but the steps taken to ensure the elimination of microorganisms are not as stringent, notes the Wound, Ostomy and Continence Nurses Society.

Aseptic meningitis has been reported as one of the complications of IVIG, especially with large doses and rapid infusions, and in the treatment of patients with autoimmune disease. 13 Interestingly, this rarely occurs in immunodeficient subjects. Symptoms, including headache, stiff neck, and photophobia, usually develop within 24 hours after completion of the infusion and may last 3-5 days. Spinal fluid pleocytosis occurs in most patients. 13 Long-term complications are minimal. The etiology of aseptic meningitis is unclear but migraine has been reported as a risk factor and may be associated with recurrence despite the use of different IVIG preparations and slower rates of infusion.

Septic and aseptic complications of corticosteroid injections

septic and aseptic complications of corticosteroid injections

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